Tuesday, February 17, 2015

May God Bless America

I do not agree with Glenn Greenwald on everything. We are polar opposites on Israel, for example. But on the US doctrine of perpetual war, we are in utter agreement

The irrationality of American war-making only makes sense when you realize that it is intended to stoke more warfare, its purpose is to sell guns, bombs, tanks, and missiles. From the standpoint of the military industrial complex, more war is good. It sells more stuff. For the owners of the war companies, the globalist bankers, all that they need to do is print more dollars to pay for more bullets. They run the Fed, which means that they run the printing press. So they get paid.

I recognize that referring to "globalist bankers" instantly pigeonholes me as a "conspiracy theorist," and most of you are reflexively clicking away to another page. But read on. I have things to say to you. 

Too many of us make our living from that doctrine of perpetual war, we feed at the edges of a vast economy that puts food on our tables, it buys our homes and our cars, it puts our kids through school. While few of us are bankers, we all pay them. Bankers are at the apex of an American militarism that features Democrats and Republicans voting in unanimity for war policies. Bankers fund politicians. Politicians support the military industrial complex and get reelected by we, the people. The revolving door between the Treasury Department and Goldman Sachs never stops, and the anonymous owners of the Federal Reserve, acting through foundations, the shareholders of the biggest banks, just keep getting richer. Their rapacity is insatiable.

For the owners of the military industrial complex, those shadowy fat cats represented by the board of governors of the New York Federal Reserve, endless war means endless profit. The shareholders of those international banks embody the adage, "run the coinage and the courts, let the rabble have the rest." While that old saying was long attributed to the Rothschilds, the truth is that no one knows who actually said it first. What is not disputed is that it is true. For war is good for business, war means vast sums are transferred, borrowed, lent, spent, and more currency is printed, more zeros are tacked onto unimaginable spreadsheets in central banks worldwide. The Fed's board of governors runs the central banks. War is a machine.

What America has gotten exceedingly good at, is minimizing our own casualties in our wars. As an American soldier, I would not have it any other way. And we inflict destruction with unprecedented precision and ferocity. The victims of our wars are depicted on our news shows, a five second clip of dazed refugees squatting among rubble. A journalist gravely reports from Tripoli, Damascus, Baghdad. And then we turn to sports.

I fear that we are creating a world that will be unsurvivable for America as decades pass. Our current wars lack the morality of WW I and WW II. Even the Korean police action was morally defensible. Not so the Vietnam war. That war rent the fabric of American society, and it established an antipathy to war that endured until the Grenada invasion, when students kissing the tarmac upon their safe return to American soil turned the American zeitgeist on a dime, and suddenly, Americans stopped hating soldiers.



I remember what it was like when Americans hated war and hated soldiers. I enlisted in 1979, and my decision was not popular. I fought in Grenada, and so I experienced personally the change in American attitudes after we returned home. Urgent Fury was a classical small war, it lasted mere days, though for some of us who fought there it will never end. The shift in American attitudes was slower, and gradual, but Grenada was the pivot point.



America seemed confused during the 1980's, our wars in Panama and Somalia were small wars, they mattered in geopolitical terms, and they mattered greatly to us soldiers, but they had little impact on American society, and I see in retrospect that this was when our political masters realized that they could wage small wars and most of the populace would barely notice. Professional soldiers would always fight the wars of the day, regardless of the rationale. The paradigm solidified.

The American way of warfare was refined during the Gulf war, our special operators honed in Somalia and the Balkans, and now, suddenly, America has been at war since 2001, fourteen years and counting. Regardless of the moral ambiguity of the Iraq war, most Americans agree that Saddam was a tyrant, and more broadly, that Muslim extremists are savages, and they need killing.

Those of us who fought in these wars went because we are soldiers, and that is what we do. Those of us who have seen these Muslim cultures up close have no compunction against killing Afghans and Iraqis, those of us who have witnessed Man-Love Thursday, pedophilia, bestiality, their systemic corruption, their war lords, and the institutionalized maltreatment of their women can kill their perpetrators and feel little guilt.

I agree that none of this is any of our business. If Muslims wish to live in this fashion in their own lands, we should not care, no matter how many homosexuals that they execute, regardless of how many rape victims that they stone for adultery. Muslims should live under Sharia, however they define it in practice, in their own lands. And they should not have to nervously watch the skies for American drones. But this sort of isolationism will not feed the war machine.

Which suddenly makes unpopular governmental policies facilitating Muslim immigration into European countries understandable. The globalist bankers want a certain number of Muslim extremists salted among the Muslim diaspora. They will kill innocent people, for Allah, in support of jihad, whatever, and the war machine will sell more guns and bullets, because the populations of those countries will demand increased security. More cops, more surveillance, bigger intelligence agencies.

Suddenly, you realize why America must have a Department of Homeland Security, why DHS is claiming that "rightwing sovereign citizens" are a potential threat, and why American governments must facilitate the entry of illegal aliens into a country that never had more people out of work. Occasional acts of terrorism™, police militarization, and paradoxical efforts to infringe the 2d Amendment which stoke unprecedented sales of guns and bullets, all help create the conditions that the war machine needs to sell more stuff. When wars overseas are not creating sufficient demand, the deep state can incite more domestic need for more guns, more bullets, more cops, more surveillance, and more intelligence contractors. They do not care about your liberties. They just want to get paid.

Today Americans celebrate their soldiers, and I wonder whether soldiers were more beloved during WW II. Perhaps not. Now is a good time to be a soldier, and the good times look like they will continue indefinitely, as we have created an enemy in ISIS that is now transnational, its footprint spans Libya, Syria, Iraq, and Yemen, and it threatens to metastasize everywhere, even as its lone gunmen strike in Europe. ISIS has money, it has an ideology that is potent, and they know how to use the internet.

Most of all, the YouTube atrocities committed by these insane Muslim extremists whitewashes American warmongering. All that we have to ensure is that we avoid incidents like Abu Ghraib. The idiots that took those photos introduced the orange jumpsuit into the visual vernacular, to the woe of ISIS victims.

Central bankers will keep our wars small, minimizing their impact on American society, they will seek to keep them on foreign lands, and they will keep them focused against Muslim savages, even while they encourage greater spending on domestic security. They will keep our own casualties low. It does not matter if countries like Egypt conduct airstrikes against ISIS. The rage of the Jordanians is also fine. They are all customers of the American war machine.

The central bankers will profit from this war machine for a generation or more.

May God bless America.


Originally posted on Facebook.

3 Comments:

Anonymous B said...

Don't take this the wrong way-I have personal respect for you. But your viewpoint is inconsistent. The cognitive dissonance is typical for US elite troops/contractors/etc., who have to look for some way to find honor in serving the dishonorable. Good luck squaring that circle.

>those of us who have witnessed Man-Love Thursday, pedophilia, bestiality, their systemic corruption, their war lords, and the institutionalized maltreatment of their women can kill their perpetrators and feel little guilt

America is the country pushing homosexuality, transsexuality, gay adoption of children:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2305125/Gay-couple-accused-molesting-9-adopted-children-withdraw-guilty-plea-decide-trial-fight-allegations.html

http://rt.com/news/pedophile-syndicate-russian-boy-481/

I've seen some fruity stuff in Afghanistan and much more in Iraq, but I haven't seen anything remotely as gay as that picture of the redeploying Marine making out with his "husband," or the gay wedding of the two captains in the White House.

Corruption? We've both seen the American bases downrange, built at huge cost on no-bid contracts, with showers that are wired to the ungrounded electrical system, etc.

I've only known a couple of Afghan "war lords." They struck me as guys who got to where they were by having a reputation, earned over several decades, for courage and integrity, for doing right by their guys and having balls. Not by being top blocked on OERs and NCOERs. Their tribes trusted them to do the right thing. If I had to choose to put my life in their hands or those of the typical US Army or Marine Corps company commander, it would be an easy choice. Naturally, they had plenty of flaws, but the fact remains-they got and stayed where they were by having lots of guys with everything at stake put their lives at their disposal.

As for women-the West turns women into soulless consumer whores with a trail of abortions and a meaningless career in a bureaucracy. Not all women, but that's the aspirational fantasy as sold by Sex and the City, Eat Pray Love, etc.

As for the West's terror problem, as you say, it is caused by importing Muslims. The 9/11 hijackers didn't sail homemade dingies to the US-they came legally. I left the military and went back to college and was very impressed by the number of Somalis, Arabs, Pakistanis walking around my large American university rocking hijabs and Salafi beards, majoring in Islamic Grievance Studies (taught by socialists and radical Muslims.) It's not a coincidence that Sayid Qutb, Aafia Siddiqui, Khalid Shaikh Mohammed, Ramzi Yousef all studied in the West.

It's not reasonable to call ISIS "extremists." They are merely being consistent in their application of Islamic law. Rather, it is the Muslims who are not with them (yet) who are halfhearted. Success brings success, and I assume we will see the problem get much, much worse soon. After all, what does the West have to offer as a counternarrative? An endless celebration of degeneracy, debasement and nihilism? That finds lots of takers, but none of them are willing to die for it. The Huns were terrible, of course, but Rome had nothing to offer its citizens worth dying for. While many of America's elite troops are stellar guys, I wonder how many of them would be willing to take the odds that the enemy faces every day. In 2007, I heard team guys saying "I'm just gonna keep getting sent back here until I get killed or crippled." And that was when we were losing one guy per deployment killed and a couple of dozen wounded per battalion. In 2011, all I saw Marines browsing on the OPCEN greenside laptop in their compound was either GI Bill monthly payouts or the truck they were gonna buy with their re-up bonus. That's pretty thin gravy.

Sorry to be a downer, I'm sure you know all this stuff yourself.

3:07 AM, February 22, 2015  
Blogger Estéban Trujillo de Gutiérrez said...

Not a downer at all. There is a lot of food for thought, and your views are interesting.

Thanks for taking the time to talk. I am going to think about some of this.

7:44 AM, February 22, 2015  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Once again a great post. Keep up the excellent work. RLTW

8:02 AM, March 12, 2015  

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